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1up Show Theme Orchestra - Chris Tilton

1up Show Theme Orchestra

Chris Tilton • 1up Show Theme

♫ Wanna stay home and play all my video games ♫

More than a few of us — peeps that came up in the game blogging scene during the mid-to-late aughties — modeled our voices, our steez if you will, after the cats putting in work at 1UP and its trendsetting shows.

Even as layoffs and game companies picked its staff clean, Jeremy Parish and his skeleton crew managed to make great things with barebones resources. Plus, they called Tiny Cartridge one of the 101 Best Video Game Sites, and invited JC to take part in an episode of Retronauts!

So, it’s awful to hear that Ziff Davis/1UP is shutting down 1UP and laying off most of its team. :o( I’ll be spending the rest of this afternoon listening to these old 1UP Show theme arrangements I downloaded years ago and kept for some reason.

  • Source neogaf.com
"Princess Peach" by Masao
Let’s all go into the weekend in this spirit: stretched out on a cushion, just playing whatever makes us happy, whether it’s Fire Emblem or Mega Man 2 – oh yeah, Mega Man 2’s out on eShop this week! – or something from the backlog.
BUY New Super Mario Bros. 2, New Super Mario Bros. U

"Princess Peach" by Masao

Let’s all go into the weekend in this spirit: stretched out on a cushion, just playing whatever makes us happy, whether it’s Fire Emblem or Mega Man 2 – oh yeah, Mega Man 2’s out on eShop this week! – or something from the backlog.

BUY New Super Mario Bros. 2, New Super Mario Bros. U
  • Source pixiv.net
Not everyone’s happy about the 3DS hacking news
Opponents of the Nintendo 3DS’s region-locking and homebrew-blocking welcomed yesterday’s news that hackers have made great strides in working around the system’s security. You can see evidence of that in the above image posted this morning, which shows a custom 3DS notification (with a nod to The World Ends With You).
Though hacker Neimod is against allowing his 3DS exploit to be used for loading commercial software, some are worried about the piracy implications of this latest development. Jools Watsham, head of Mutant Mudds maker Renegade Kid, believes this could nonetheless pave the way for 3DS piracy:






"Piracy on the Nintendo DS crippled the DS retail market, especially in Europe. … If piracy gets bad on the 3DS, we will have no choice but to stop supporting the platform with new games. …
The good news is that Nintendo has the ability to put up a good fight against pirates due to 3DS system updates and such. Let’s hope this is enough to stop piracy.”







1UP’s Jeremy Parish voiced similar concerns:






"The underlying intent of hacking a machine like this is to open the door for piracy. … The advent of 3DS software piracy seems likely to be the worst possible thing that could happen to the system, especially in the U.S.
I can’t help but worry that the only thing helping to prop up the 3DS’s meager U.S. software sales so far has been the fact that you have to buy them to play them. Take away that limitation, and will we see the 3DS market implode the same way the DS market did? It’s hard to imagine otherwise.”






NeoGAF’s Duckroll, however, has a great argument for why cheering on 3DS hacking isn’t necessarily wrong, despite its potential ramifications:



"If somehow the advent of piracy is tied to something which also makes buying customers who do not pirate rejoice, this means you’re doing something wrong. That does not mean buying customers are cheering for piracy, it means that either the feature set in the base package is not satisfactory, or that somehow in the pursuit of preventing piracy something has been implemented which has an adverse effect on paying customers. Neither of these factors are good.
Ideally, a company should keep consumers happy because they are what keeps the company alive. If no one buys anything, then the company dies. It is often better to put resources towards keeping customers who you know exist happy, rather than being stubborn and believing that by preventing piracy completely, you will automatically make money. This is why in general every draconian DRM scheme has largely failed.”



As for where we stand on the controversial topic of hacking the 3DS, we’ve decided that we’re neutral on the issue — a brave and bold stance, we know! We’ve mentioned in the past that there is a lot of value to homebrew capabilities and devices add to consoles, but we believe Parish and Watsham’s concerns are valid. Piracy on the DS was no joke, and that likely affected what publishers ended up releasing for the system.
So, while we would love a region-free 3DS, we wouldn’t want it to come at the cost of developers abandoning the system because they can’t make a buck off it anymore.
BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases

Not everyone’s happy about the 3DS hacking news

Opponents of the Nintendo 3DS’s region-locking and homebrew-blocking welcomed yesterday’s news that hackers have made great strides in working around the system’s security. You can see evidence of that in the above image posted this morning, which shows a custom 3DS notification (with a nod to The World Ends With You).

Though hacker Neimod is against allowing his 3DS exploit to be used for loading commercial software, some are worried about the piracy implications of this latest development. Jools Watsham, head of Mutant Mudds maker Renegade Kid, believes this could nonetheless pave the way for 3DS piracy:

"Piracy on the Nintendo DS crippled the DS retail market, especially in Europe. … If piracy gets bad on the 3DS, we will have no choice but to stop supporting the platform with new games. …

The good news is that Nintendo has the ability to put up a good fight against pirates due to 3DS system updates and such. Let’s hope this is enough to stop piracy.”

Read more

New Super Mario Bros. 2’s infinite lives tricks

With all the coins in New Super Mario Bros. 2, picking up extra Mans should be no challenge, but what’s a Mario game without a few infinite lives tricks? It’s not much of a Mario game, to answer your question. Or my question. Or whatever, it’s a question, and it’s answered now.

I have videos of these feats. Let’s start with World 2-4:

Read more

It’s been up a few days, but in case you missed it, Jeremy Parish posted a great preview of CyberConnect2’s niche action RPG Solatorobo. Even if you’ve seen it already, it’s worth checking out again and sending 1UP traffic because, seriously, what other site would post an import preview of CyberConnect2’s niche action RPG Solatorobo?

Everything about the fur-filled game, especially its stunning presentation, sounds great, with the exception of it being a DSi-enhanced title — which means an imported copy won’t play on your North American DSi or DSi XL. Hey, U.S. publishers, a localized release would fix that!

Oh, and two other Parish-penned previews you ought to peruse if you don’t have much else going on tonight:

  • Radiant Historia - “highly tactical game that offers a unique take on the concept of branching storylines”
  • Tactics Ogre: Wheel of Fortune (PSP) - “bucks the industry’s trend toward simplification with a vast, time-consuming odyssey”

Import: Solatorobo: And Then to Coda

See also: Solatorobo trailers

[Image via Rakuraku, Dat Fur joke via GHNeku]

Number 1 in the hood, G

In case you didn’t see it in our header above (which received the torch from Lord Toon’s excellent "Mega Shock" image), 1UP recently recognized our rinky dink operation in its "101 Favorite Gaming Sites" list.

The other sites JC and I write for — Joystiq, Gamasutra, and GameSetWatch — received the same accolade, but I’m proud of Tiny Cartridge’s characterization as “a labor of love”. We run this site in our spare time, constantly searching for DS novelties to share with you because it’s what we love to do, so I’m pleased that love shows.

See also: Lots of love for Tiny

[Via Eastern Mind, NintenDaan, and GoNintendo — all great sites deserving the same distinction (GN is in the list, too!); Image via Donald’s awesome “Tiny in SF” series]

In an event so rare that its value can’t be expressed in monies, 1UP will broadcast gameplay of absolutely real NES game Bio Force Ape during its “Game Night” event. “It was the subject of one of the greatest hoaxes in internet history,” Frank Cifaldi said in the announcement, “is weird as hell, and is considered something of a holy grail amongst retro gaming enthusiasts.” This is an event so powerful it could disrupt NES graphics.

Check the video player embedded in this post at 5PM PST to see this completely real unreleased NES game from 1991 that is definitely not a homebrew game based on a message board joke. Although, if it were, the fact that a completely new game was made from scratch would actually be more impressive than some unreleased game from the distant past. But no, definitely not the case. Be there or eat communism!

EGM :(

Electronic Gaming Monthly is being shut down following the sale of 1UP to UGO. I keep trying to think of a way to say this, but I don’t want to talk about ‘condolences’ or ‘sympathies’ or whatever, because that sounds too much like someone died, so I’ll say it crassly: to our friends at EGM/1UP, this is totally shitty, and I hope you guys weather the shittiness okay.

We’re going to see a lot of very sad reminiscences from a lot of bloggers over the next few days, so I’ll keep mine brief. More than any publication, it was classic EGM that made me feel like I wanted to participate in some kind of video game culture. Everything in gaming that I really care about — wacky imports, fan culture, retro, cheats — I first got hooked on by reading about it in EGM.

While I’m personally saddened by the fact that I’ll never achieve my life goal of writing for this magazine, I’m much more upset at what feels like the loss of one of the centers of our community. And even more upset that people I admire aren’t considered valuable enough by some dumb website.

I missed last week’s 1UP FM podcast due to holiday freak-outishness, which means that I missed a 35-minute interview with Jeremiah Slaczka, Creative Director of 5th Cell, and Matt Cox, lead designer of Scribblenauts. It’s definitely worth checking out, as is anything related to Scribblenauts.

It’s pretty interesting to hear Slaczka’s perspective on the big user-generated content boom of this year, since 5th Cell kind of anticipated it with Drawn to Life.

(The post title isn’t meant to imply rambling — I was just looking for a speech equivalent to scribbling.)

See also: Tiny Q&A: Lock’s Quest and producing art for DS