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72 posts tagged piracy

Newer 3DSes hacked for homebrew, not piracy ⊟

Up until now, if you wanted to run unauthorized code on a 3DS (e.g. load homebrew, play pirated games, bypass region-locking), you needed to procure a system without any firmware updates newer than v4.5, which released 15 months ago. But in this new video, hacker Smealum demonstrates an exploit he’s uncovered that runs in v6.3 (released six months ago) and potentially current firmware.

While Smealum doesn’t want his work used for piracy, he says that’s not an issue with his SSSpwn exploit, as by it’s nature the hack can’t be used for that:

"It’s the sweet spot that gives us just enough to get awesome homebrew code running in arm11 user mode, but not enough to break the system bad enough to let anyone do whatever the hell they want. As such, I personally have no qualms with releasing the exploit into the wild."

Smealum hasn’t released it yet, as he doesn’t want to “burn such a nice [vulnerability]” when it’s possible the hack can work with current and even future 3DS firmware. He’s hoping to give other reputable developers/hackers a crack at the exploit, though, so they can create 3DS homebrew dev tools.

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  • Source smealum.net
Small victory for homebrew software in Europe ⊟
The Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled that it’s legal to circumvent encryption systems on your video game console, so long as you’re not doing it to play pirated games. So if you were to use unauthorized devices to run media programs or homebrew games, you won’t be breaking the law.
This issue came up in a lawsuit between Nintendo and Italian retailer PC Box, the latter of which had been bundling DSes and Wiis with devices that bypassed the consoles’ encryption security. PC Box was able to successfully argue that those devices enabled users to run unauthorized software (e.g. MoonShell media player, Homebrew Channel).
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Courthouse News Service noted:

European law expressly permits right holders to use technology to protect their copyrighted material ‘without preventing the normal operation of electronic equipment and its technological development.’
The Luxembourg-based high court acknowledged Thursday that Nintendo has right to copy-protect its games but said the company ‘must not go beyond what is necessary for this purpose.’
To determine that, the Italian court must look at whether encryption codes installed on both consoles and games is overkill by Nintendo, according to the ruling.”

That doesn’t mean PC Box is off the hook, as a court in Milan will now investigate how often the retailer’s customers used their bundled devices to run bootlegged games versus homebrew software. It will also look at how often the devices in question are used for piracy purposes versus homebrew apps/games.
Nintendo responded to the ruling in a statement:

"Since Nintendo only ever utilizes technological protection measures which are both necessary and proportionate to prevent widespread piracy of its intellectual property, and since the preponderant purpose of the circumvention devices marketed by PC Box is to enable piracy of legitimate video games, Nintendo is confident that the application of the guidance set out by the CJEU relating to proportionality will enable the Milan Tribunal to determine that the sale of circumvention devices is unlawful."
"In the meantime, Nintendo maintains that the commercial dealings in circumvention devices infringe copyright laws as well as other intellectual property laws and Nintendo will continue to pursue those involved in the distribution of such devices."

This ruling comes shortly after a hacker demonstrated progress in running homebrew software on Nintendo 3DSes (and a week after someone else shared instructions for a risky way to play games from other regions), which hasn’t been possible for most system owners due to the handheld’s aggressive anti-piracy protections.
However, flashcard manufacturers and piracy advocates have kept up the pace with their own developments on the 3DS, recently showing off new capabilities for running multiple bootlegged games on a flashcard.
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Small victory for homebrew software in Europe ⊟

The Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled that it’s legal to circumvent encryption systems on your video game console, so long as you’re not doing it to play pirated games. So if you were to use unauthorized devices to run media programs or homebrew games, you won’t be breaking the law.

This issue came up in a lawsuit between Nintendo and Italian retailer PC Box, the latter of which had been bundling DSes and Wiis with devices that bypassed the consoles’ encryption security. PC Box was able to successfully argue that those devices enabled users to run unauthorized software (e.g. MoonShell media player, Homebrew Channel).

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  • Source gbatemp.net

Here’s 3DS homebrew loaded on a custom channel ⊟

Between hackers finding a way to disable the 3DS’s region lock, and people seeing their handhelds “bricked” when using modified launchers on flashcarts (as is required for the mentioned region-lock hack), it’s a busy month for people using Nintendo’s portable in unauthorized ways.

And here’s another development! Famous 3DS hacker Smealum can be seen in this proof-of-concept video loading homebrew software (Yeti3D adapted to work with the touchscreen, circle pad, and 3D screen) on a 3DS through a custom channel he’s created.

Smealum explains why this is a big deal:

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Hackers found a way to disable 3DS region lock ⊟
This isn’t the same development that allowed pirates to load likely bootlegged ROMs from other regions on their 3DS — this new trick enables you to play a legit imported cartridge on your system. Again, this is not for piracy whatsoever and it does not play ROMs, just retail games.
Like most 3DS hacks lately, you need a 3DS with v4.1-4.5 firmware, so if you have updated your portable in the last nine months, you’re out of luck. By using a DS or 3DS flashcard compatible with the legacy firmware, you can run a special patched launcher file that modifies your system to load cartridges from other regions. You can even install more recent firmware afterward to play imported games that require it (with a few caveats for online play that might require game patches from region-specific eShops).
Time to import Attack on Titan 3DS and preorder New Love Plus+.
BUY Nintendo 2DS & 3DS/XL, imported games, upcoming games

Hackers found a way to disable 3DS region lock ⊟

This isn’t the same development that allowed pirates to load likely bootlegged ROMs from other regions on their 3DS — this new trick enables you to play a legit imported cartridge on your system. Again, this is not for piracy whatsoever and it does not play ROMs, just retail games.

Like most 3DS hacks lately, you need a 3DS with v4.1-4.5 firmware, so if you have updated your portable in the last nine months, you’re out of luck. By using a DS or 3DS flashcard compatible with the legacy firmware, you can run a special patched launcher file that modifies your system to load cartridges from other regions. You can even install more recent firmware afterward to play imported games that require it (with a few caveats for online play that might require game patches from region-specific eShops).

Time to import Attack on Titan 3DS and preorder New Love Plus+.

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  • Source gbatemp.net

3DS flashcard bypasses region locking

I didn’t take the Gateway 3DS flashcard seriously at first due to a number of flaws: requiring separate MicroSD cards to load each game, working with only eight-month-old firmware, and offering no support for homebrew or out-of-region games.

The device’s team, though, is showing off an “alpha build” to address some of those issues. In the first part of this video, you’ll see firmware-spoofing support — you still need a 3DS with version 4.5 firmware or older to run the card, but it can now play games that require the latest system update, like Mario & Luigi: Dream Team.

And in the video’s other two parts, the Gateway team demonstrates how a system from one region can play a game from another. There’s a growing campaign against the 3DS’s region locking online, and the group behind it argues that one of the primary reasons why people buy these devices that Nintendo calls "illegal game copiers" is to play releases from other countries. I doubt this development will change anything, but one can hope.

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This could be the first 3DS flashcard

I say “could” because who knows if this is legit, what with this news coming out of nowhere from a company no one’s heard of, but this demonstration video looks credible. Gateway says its device supports both standard and XL 3DSes, and works with any back-up ROMs. It’s disappointing that the first product of this sort seems geared more toward piracy (which, we must once again remind you, we absolutely do not support) than homebrew purposes…

MaxConsole claims this video was put together before the Gateway team created some kind of “game manager” for the device, hence all the MicroSD switching you see here. However, there is also speculation that Nintendo could easily cripple the flashcard with a firmware update due to the presumed nature of its workaround (which doesn’t look like it would even circumvent the system’s region-locking). 

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If you wish upon yourself (and all other 3DS gamers) a market flooded with uninspired licensed/sequel/sports games over original ideas and mechanics, then by all means there’s nothing to worry about.

DreamRift’s Peter Ong (Epic Mickey 3DS) explains why gamers should be worried about 3DS hacking and piracy on the system, arguing that publishers are hesitant to try anything new when funding projects for platforms plagued by piracy.

BUY: Epic Mickey games, Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion
Not everyone’s happy about the 3DS hacking news
Opponents of the Nintendo 3DS’s region-locking and homebrew-blocking welcomed yesterday’s news that hackers have made great strides in working around the system’s security. You can see evidence of that in the above image posted this morning, which shows a custom 3DS notification (with a nod to The World Ends With You).
Though hacker Neimod is against allowing his 3DS exploit to be used for loading commercial software, some are worried about the piracy implications of this latest development. Jools Watsham, head of Mutant Mudds maker Renegade Kid, believes this could nonetheless pave the way for 3DS piracy:






"Piracy on the Nintendo DS crippled the DS retail market, especially in Europe. … If piracy gets bad on the 3DS, we will have no choice but to stop supporting the platform with new games. …
The good news is that Nintendo has the ability to put up a good fight against pirates due to 3DS system updates and such. Let’s hope this is enough to stop piracy.”







1UP’s Jeremy Parish voiced similar concerns:






"The underlying intent of hacking a machine like this is to open the door for piracy. … The advent of 3DS software piracy seems likely to be the worst possible thing that could happen to the system, especially in the U.S.
I can’t help but worry that the only thing helping to prop up the 3DS’s meager U.S. software sales so far has been the fact that you have to buy them to play them. Take away that limitation, and will we see the 3DS market implode the same way the DS market did? It’s hard to imagine otherwise.”






NeoGAF’s Duckroll, however, has a great argument for why cheering on 3DS hacking isn’t necessarily wrong, despite its potential ramifications:



"If somehow the advent of piracy is tied to something which also makes buying customers who do not pirate rejoice, this means you’re doing something wrong. That does not mean buying customers are cheering for piracy, it means that either the feature set in the base package is not satisfactory, or that somehow in the pursuit of preventing piracy something has been implemented which has an adverse effect on paying customers. Neither of these factors are good.
Ideally, a company should keep consumers happy because they are what keeps the company alive. If no one buys anything, then the company dies. It is often better to put resources towards keeping customers who you know exist happy, rather than being stubborn and believing that by preventing piracy completely, you will automatically make money. This is why in general every draconian DRM scheme has largely failed.”



As for where we stand on the controversial topic of hacking the 3DS, we’ve decided that we’re neutral on the issue — a brave and bold stance, we know! We’ve mentioned in the past that there is a lot of value to homebrew capabilities and devices add to consoles, but we believe Parish and Watsham’s concerns are valid. Piracy on the DS was no joke, and that likely affected what publishers ended up releasing for the system.
So, while we would love a region-free 3DS, we wouldn’t want it to come at the cost of developers abandoning the system because they can’t make a buck off it anymore.
BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases

Not everyone’s happy about the 3DS hacking news

Opponents of the Nintendo 3DS’s region-locking and homebrew-blocking welcomed yesterday’s news that hackers have made great strides in working around the system’s security. You can see evidence of that in the above image posted this morning, which shows a custom 3DS notification (with a nod to The World Ends With You).

Though hacker Neimod is against allowing his 3DS exploit to be used for loading commercial software, some are worried about the piracy implications of this latest development. Jools Watsham, head of Mutant Mudds maker Renegade Kid, believes this could nonetheless pave the way for 3DS piracy:

"Piracy on the Nintendo DS crippled the DS retail market, especially in Europe. … If piracy gets bad on the 3DS, we will have no choice but to stop supporting the platform with new games. …

The good news is that Nintendo has the ability to put up a good fight against pirates due to 3DS system updates and such. Let’s hope this is enough to stop piracy.”

Read more

More Nintendo 3DS hacking progress
Hackers have reportedly made considerable gains in breaking open the 3DS since their breakthrough a week ago, when someone finally managed to breach the handheld’s protections and run custom code on the device.
Coder Xcution is showing off homebrew tests like the image above, and now another hacker named Neimod claims to have full control of the system in kernel mode with an unmodified 3DS and an exploit that uses a specific retail game.
While he says this exploit could be easily patched, Neimod notes that “with full kernel control, anything is possible,” including circumventing the 3DS’s pesky region lock. He adds that he has no interest in allowing others to use the hack to load pirated software.
BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases

More Nintendo 3DS hacking progress

Hackers have reportedly made considerable gains in breaking open the 3DS since their breakthrough a week ago, when someone finally managed to breach the handheld’s protections and run custom code on the device.

Coder Xcution is showing off homebrew tests like the image above, and now another hacker named Neimod claims to have full control of the system in kernel mode with an unmodified 3DS and an exploit that uses a specific retail game.

While he says this exploit could be easily patched, Neimod notes that “with full kernel control, anything is possible,” including circumventing the 3DS’s pesky region lock. He adds that he has no interest in allowing others to use the hack to load pirated software.

BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases
3DS homebrew/hacking progress
Noted game console hacker Yellows8 claims to have circumvented the 3DS’s securities and run custom code on the device, according to this photo he took as evidence. He was able to run this code with the latest firmware installed, though technical issues disabled the 3D LED and have so far prevented the system from displaying graphics.
I’m uncertain how Yellows8 pulled this off, but GBAtemp member SifJar shared this thought to put the news in perspective:



"There are only two known vulnerabilities for code execution, and both would most likely be patched at once, so I’d guess it’s unlikely there’ll be a release unless another, more unique, vulnerability [is] found for Yellows8 (and those he chooses to share with) to use for further exploration once the released exploit is patched."



Nintendo has managed to keep homebrew and pirated 3DS software off its system for nearly two years now, and I imagine its engineers would be quick to release an update that would kill this latest hack.
BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases

3DS homebrew/hacking progress

Noted game console hacker Yellows8 claims to have circumvented the 3DS’s securities and run custom code on the device, according to this photo he took as evidence. He was able to run this code with the latest firmware installed, though technical issues disabled the 3D LED and have so far prevented the system from displaying graphics.

I’m uncertain how Yellows8 pulled this off, but GBAtemp member SifJar shared this thought to put the news in perspective:

"There are only two known vulnerabilities for code execution, and both would most likely be patched at once, so I’d guess it’s unlikely there’ll be a release unless another, more unique, vulnerability [is] found for Yellows8 (and those he chooses to share with) to use for further exploration once the released exploit is patched."

Nintendo has managed to keep homebrew and pirated 3DS software off its system for nearly two years now, and I imagine its engineers would be quick to release an update that would kill this latest hack.

BUY Nintendo 3DS and 3DS XL consoles, upcoming releases
  • Source gbatemp.net

Latest 3DS update manages to block almost all existing flashcarts permanently

You know that unexciting firmware update your 3DS automatically downloaded last week and prompted you to install when you opened your system?

It might not have seemed like much at the time — Nintendo’s changelog for version 4.4.0-10U is characteristically vague — but the update permanently blocks almost all flashcarts, according to SuperCard. They would know, being a manufacturer of these devices!

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Minor 3DS firmware update still manages to block a few flashcarts

Nintendo has rolled out a new firmware release for the 3DS across all major territories, but before you get excited, according to the company’s Japanese site, the only notable addition is there are more character options for your password when storing credit card data on eShop.

Other than that, there’s the vague mention of “improved system stability and convenience” in this 4.2.0-9 update’s change log, and you should know by now what that means — several flashcart owners have reported problems loading their devices after installing the firmware.

Anyone else surprised that the Nintendo 3DS is more than a year old now and hardly any progress has been made by would-be 3DS pirates or homebrew developers? Nintendo’s persistent efforts to lock out these devices probably has a lot to do with this.

Buy: Nintendo 3DS (Flame Red, Pearl Pink, Black, & Blue)
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See also: More piracy news