Tiny Cartridge 3DS

Oh god, these Yoshi’s Wooly World prototypes ⊟

These way cute prototype pics of the Wii U game popped up in this afternoon’s Treehouse E3 stream segment with producer Takashi Tezuka. Like everything else awesome shown at E3, it won’t come out here until some time next year. The actual game is super adorable too.

Thanks to Ewzzy for the tip and for posting the shots online!

PREORDER Yoshi's Wooly World, upcoming games
  • Source ewzzy

More Wii U GamePad experiments and prototypes — the Zapper one on the left actually led to Nintendo adding a gyro sensor to the 3DS.

These shots came from the Iwata Asks developer interview for Nintendo Land, which has this odd revelation: Nintendo Land actually has an ending! When you acquire all the stars in each game, you’re treated to this end credits sequence (watch until the end).

BUY Nintendo Land

Profanity-laced NBA Jam XXX, allegedly a prototype of the SNES game that replaces famous phrases like “Boom-Shakalaka” with much more vulgar versions. Skip to the 02:00 mark of this video to hear what I mean.

A former Acclaim Entertainment employee sent the game to Nintendo Player, and provided this explanation about the Iguana Entertainment-developed prototype:

"Due to the memory constraints of the 16-bit system, the long strands of voice samples from the classic arcade game had to be modified to fit an [SNES] cartridge. Tim Kitzrow, NBA Jam‘s memorable voice-over announcer, was called back into the studio to shorten his calls.

During one of these recording sessions, a number of outtakes were saved as a joke, which served as the basis for a special, profanity-filled, in-house-only game–one that, if word ever got out about its existence, could have severely jeopardized Acclaim’s relationship with the NBA league and completely shut down NBA Jam‘s development for good.”

Who knows if any of this is true. While I’m watching Team USA play Argentina later tonight, though, I won’t be able to not imagine Kitzrow yelling “Get that shit outta here!” whenever Tyson Chandler blocks a shot.

Buy: NBA Jam
See also: More prototypes
[Via @sardoose]

Intro to a pre-release prototype of Flying Warriors, captured by Sardius of Dream and Friends. Just a few weeks ago, I played this game for a while and enjoyed its awkwardness. For some reason, I’ve always liked the Culture Brain “Flying” games; when I was a kid, I was really impressed by the one-on-one fights. I thought the mechanic where you’d press a direction to attack or defend a weak spot in response to a prompt was the cleverest thing.

And, well, if I found them endearing before

Buy: Flying Warriors

See also: More prototypes

This is a pretty damn amazing find on the part of the TCRF/Lost Levellers who made it happen: a prototype version of the Famicom Disk System release of The Legend of Zelda has been found and ripped!

The changes mostly involve number of enemies (way more enemies were added to almost every dungeon room in the final release), though there are slight differences in room layouts, music and sound effect changes, and tweaks in gameplay (like the Wizzrobes’ beams hurting less, and the screen not pausing when you use a candle). You can’t even hit the old man!

I say this a lot, but given that I can now download and play a version of my favorite Zelda that I’ve never seen before, it’s a Christmas miracle.

Buy: The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks, Phantom Hourglass, and more

See also: More Legend of Zelda posts

[Via Lost Levels, @sardoose]

DSi dummy console. This might be the rarest DSi that you’re likely to see, because it isn’t a DSi at all. It’s a nonfunctional display model originally used to show off the system before its release. 
According to the seller, “It’s really heavy, and feels much heavier than an actual console. The finish on the plastic also feels much more robust than what was eventually used on an an actual working unit.”
It sold on eBay for 93 pounds ($138) — not bad for not a DSi. The seller also had a similar GBA SP unit, which I vaguely remember seeing in store displays, maybe.
[Via GameSniped]

DSi dummy console. This might be the rarest DSi that you’re likely to see, because it isn’t a DSi at all. It’s a nonfunctional display model originally used to show off the system before its release. 

According to the seller, “It’s really heavy, and feels much heavier than an actual console. The finish on the plastic also feels much more robust than what was eventually used on an an actual working unit.”

It sold on eBay for 93 pounds ($138) — not bad for not a DSi. The seller also had a similar GBA SP unit, which I vaguely remember seeing in store displays, maybe.

[Via GameSniped]

Scans from a Nintendo pamphlet handed out to potential employees in universities. At least, that’s according to an individual at NeoGAF, which is where they first popped up (outside of 2ch). Like the very idea of working for them alone isn’t a strong enough selling point! As one can tell, they’re simply top down shots of various employees’ desks, yet they brilliantly demonstrate what a fun place it must be to work at (though once again, this is hardly any surprise).

As someone that’s fascinated by work environments in general, these photographs are simply a sight to behold, yet there are so many little things to make even the most casual Nintendo fan’s head spin. Like…

  • The alternate New Super Mario Bros. Wii box truly does make one long for the old 2D-style covers for the franchise (which only seems to be used for the Mario & Luigi series these days).
  • In fact, pretty much all the 2D renderings, especially when they’re used to illustrate a game design aspect are simply beautiful!
  • As cute as Link has been his DS outings (which are simply extensions of the style established in Wind Waker, of course), how he looks here blows all of that out of the water.
  • And that train car that looks like Tingle is also insanely awesome.
  • Has anyone seen those airship designs before? Perhaps they’re for Super Mario Galaxy 2!
  • I’m SO jealous of all the cool little Nintendo related tchotchkes that everyone has, primarily the Animal Crossing related goods! Though the clear standout would have to be the statue version of Zelda’s armor from Spirit Tracks, which seems more like a 3D aide for team members than an actual toy.
  • I also like the lone Drossel figure in one of the images (not contained in this slideshow), which makes the setup feel legit as apposed to some manufactured scene.
  • Any guesses as to how many tissues the person who handles the black Wii shown in the book must go through in a single day? No wonder all their handhelds have a matte finish.

All the images in their original sized glory can be found here, as well other examples from past promotional material, including behind the scenes artwork from Mario Kart and Rhythm Heaven, among others!

Guest post by Matt “Fort90” Hawkins

Tommy T’s Sound Editor, a NES cartridge used by composer Tommy Tallarico in early works like Color a Dinosaur. Amazingly, this rare item was found at a swap meet by NintendoAge forum user Kirakid. I can imagine chiptuners would lose their shit for something like this.

Kirakid sold this item off along with a few prototypes, including the aforementioned Color a Dinosaur. Which, by the way, is kind of amazing:

[Via Retronauts]

Original design document for a planned Steven Seagal SNES game called Under Pressure, from TekMagic. The current bid is only $1.25 for this unique item — way cheaper than prototypes for games that actually, you know, were made.
[Via GameSniped]

Original design document for a planned Steven Seagal SNES game called Under Pressure, from TekMagic. The current bid is only $1.25 for this unique item — way cheaper than prototypes for games that actually, you know, were made.

[Via GameSniped]

Green Beret (Rush’n Attack), developed by NAPS Team for Game Boy Color but eventually cancelled in 2000.

I had Rush’n Attack for the NES, and it was balls. All I remember about the game was punching dozens of Russian soldiers. This GBC game looks like more of that. More balls, is what I’m saying.

[Via Unseen64]