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18 posts tagged rom

Blip Festival Tokyo 2012 gets fancy with an SNES ROM demo and a great soundtrack. Try it on your own SNES emulator! This was designed by Batsly Adams, with graphics by KeFF and music by Zabutom. 

Blip Festival Tokyo 2012 — which will be the last Blip Festival for a while, as the show is going on hiatus — takes place October 20 and 21 at Koenji High in Tokyo, featuring tons and tons of artists. Just flipping through the lineup, I’m surprised to see composer Nobuyoshi Sano, who directed and produced the Korg DS-10 series. I guess it makes sense that he’d perform at a chiptune show!

If you’re going to the show, have fun, and try not to think too much about the sad, jealous losers you’ve left behind!

See also: More Blip Festival posts

Piracy?: Downloading DS demo ROMs

Monday’s release for Ghost Trick's new downloadable trial reminded me about the clumsiness of DS demos — the norm for almost everything Nintendo does online.

Even if you have a Nintendo DSi, downloading one of the few demos Nintendo offers each week requires a Wii and a series of steps to transmit the game from the home console to your handheld. And if you decide to shut off your portable or play another game, you need to re-download the demo to try it out again later.

Why is the selection of demos so limited? Why is it still such a pain to download one? Any why can’t I keep the demo on my DSi’s internal flash memory or an SD card?

There is a solution to all three of those problems with DS demos, but it’s either piracy or very close to it.

Read more

Cheeky anti-piracy implementation in Michael Jackson: The Experience DS. Many of the scoundrels who downloaded this game have found that the ROM not only refuses to display critical touchscreen cues but also buzzes a vuvuzela over its music! So, instead of hearing “Billie Jean is not my lover”, they’re treated to “Bzzzbzzz bzzzzz”.

This short shakycam clip doesn’t really give you a clear view of the DS game, but you’re not missing much. From everything I’ve heard, it’s trash — an Elite Beat Agents / Ouendan clone without the heart. You’re probably better off grabbing MeowWalker for your iPhone.

The anti-piracy bit is cute, though.

Buy: Michael Jackson music, Michael Jackson: The Experience (Wii, Xbox 360, PSP, PS3 and DS)

See also: Successors to Michael Jackson’s video game throne: the Wu-Tang Clan, More MJ posts

[Thanks, Lord Toon!]

If you’d like to observe the recent (hell, let’s say ongoing) NES anniversary in a unique way, you can play some of the most interesting — and least functional in emulation — NES ROMS ever made: the test cartridges used by repair centers, originally housed in cool yellow plastic.

NES Player has downloadable ROMS of the Control Deck, Power Pad, controller, and other tester cartridges. Of course, since you’d likely be playing them in emulation, there’s no NES to test, making them interesting curiosities only. 

Kotaku and LIfeHacker have posted a thorough walkthrough teaching readers how to back up their DS games and store multiple titles on a single flashcart.

Unfortunately, this isn’t possible with the standard DSi or XL models, but it’s still a useful guide that’s very much worth linking here — I always want to point to something like this when I talk about patching imported back-up games (e.g. Mother, Tales of Innocence), but it’s difficult to track down decent instructions without trawling old threads on GBAtemp or other similar forums.

I imagine a lot of misinformed dudes are accusing Kotaku of teaching kids how to steal games, but your typical pirate really doesn’t go through all this trouble just to get a free copy of Barnyard Blast. Why invest so much time in buying a game, messing with router settings, and using an obscure tool to duplicate a ROM when it’s much easier to just download the game from a popular piracy site?

As I’ve said before, there are many valid reasons why law-abiding gamers would want to back up their DS games.

See also: Flashcarts: More than ‘illegal game copiers’

"Hybrid Moments" (Misfits cover) by Tristendo. Don "No Carrier" Miller coded and designed this NES ROM flyer for Pulsewave’s Halloween show at the Tank next Saturday.

Three chiptune acts are scheduled to channel different bands for the themed show — Cheap Dinosaurs covering Goblin, Graffiti Monsters covering Minor Threat, and Womb Ripper covering Misfits.

This reminds me I still need to announce our Blip Festival 2008 CD winners. Um, I’ll get to that soon!

See also: More Pulsewave NES ROM flyers

Screenshot from Kyoryu Sentai ZyuRanger (Dinosaur Squadron Beast Ranger). As you can probably guess, this game is based on the Japanese show that eventually came to the States as Mighty Morphin Power Rangers.
Aparently this game is terrible — the first eight links that show up on Google after searching for the title say “AWFUL GAME”. In ZyuRanger's defense, though, all of the links direct you to the same goofy YouTube video.
If you’d like to play the Famicom title, Dank-Trans just posted an English translation patch, 17 years after the Japanese release. “Ai, yi, yi!”

See also: JAKQ Dengekitai, Time Gal death animations

Screenshot from Kyoryu Sentai ZyuRanger (Dinosaur Squadron Beast Ranger). As you can probably guess, this game is based on the Japanese show that eventually came to the States as Mighty Morphin Power Rangers.

Aparently this game is terrible — the first eight links that show up on Google after searching for the title say “AWFUL GAME”. In ZyuRanger's defense, though, all of the links direct you to the same goofy YouTube video.

If you’d like to play the Famicom title, Dank-Trans just posted an English translation patch, 17 years after the Japanese release. “Ai, yi, yi!”

See also: JAKQ Dengekitai, Time Gal death animations

Fake Dragon Quest IX ROM bricking DSes

You should know well enough not to pirate games, but if you plan to make an exception for Dragon Quest IX, don’t! A currently circulated ROM for the much-anticipated RPG labeled “Dragon Quest IX JPN DSi Enhanced NDS iND” could be hazardous to your portable’s health.

Released just a week before the actual game hits stores in Japan, this fake ROM will appear as a hentai slideshow when run it in an emulator. Loading it from a flashcart onto your Nintendo DS, however, will execute code that could potentially overwrite your system’s firmware and prevent it from properly booting up.

The disguised ROM, DS Owata, is similar to the r0mloader and DS Taihen apps from several years ago. Stay away from it, kids.

Preoder import: Dragon Quest IX

See also: MetaFortress unlikely to keep DS pirates at bay

[Via DS Scene]

Beautiful NES ROM flyer for Pulsewave’s May 2009 show, featuring music by Animal Style, graphics by Alex “Enso” Bond, and code by Don “No Carrier” Miller.

"Stravinsky, Nijinsky, Roerich and Diaghilev captured it in 1913. Martha Reeves and the Vandellas picked it up again in 1964.

It’s the feeling of Spring and the urge to dance in the streets.

With the change of seasons comes an unbuttoning of shirts, a raising of skirts, a lowering of inhibitions and the urge to cut loose as the grass grows under tapping toes.

This months Pulsewave is here to help.”

Chiptune artists Minusbaby, Lutin, and Adam/Stern are all slated to perform at the event this Saturday in New York City’s The Tank. VJs Paris, noteNdo, and JYK will provide the visual entertainment. As always, my jealousy over those of you attending is tremendous.

You can download the above flyer’s NES ROM, which includes a gallery mode for just viewing the images and listening to the music, at this link.

See also: More Pulsewave NES ROM flyers

[Via Enso]

"AEPOZXLU" by Alex Mauer.

Regular visitors and chiptune aficionados will recognize Mauer as the composer behind Pulsewave’s divine ROM flyers. The artist has released a new seven-track EP, Vegavox II, which you can download for free on Pause Records’ site.

With the album, Mauer and coder Don “No Carrier” Miller, also famous for his Pulsewave flyer contributions, released a ROM with scrolling graphics to accompany the music. You can even purchase one of 50 NES cartridges with the ROM.

Here’s a video preview of the Vegavox II ROM’s title screen and one of the tracks:

Narin: DSi flashcarts technically illegal, DSONEi not a complete solution

As Nintendo matures its efforts to combat piracy, giving itself the option to push downloadable DSi firmware updates to lock out flashcarts, manufacturers of these devices are already preparing their defenses.

Supercard, for example, revealed the DSONEi, a new DSi-compatible cart with its own upgradeable firmware. If Nintendo disables the current line of flashcarts with an update, Supercard owners can patch their carts (provided that hackers find a workaround) to get it back in working order, instead of having to buy a new device.

Wanting to find out more about how this will impact this battle between game companies and pirates, I spoke with GBAtemp.net’s Narin, a prominent figure in the DS “protection bypass” scene, who says that the DSONEi isn’t as evolutionary a product as most assume, and explains why owning a DSi flashcart is technically illegal:

"The Supercard DSONEi isn’t exactly special other than it including a USB slot that allows you to upgrade the card’s firmware. The AceKard 2i and the R4i I believe (the R4i is an AK2i clone actually) can have their firmware flashed in the occasion Nintendo does release an update to block them. So, what the Supercard is doing isn’t exactly new, but it just offers a different means to do so.

The problem is the method these flashcards use to circumvent the protection the DSi has. They actually use a real ROM — albeit slightly modified to run a loader — in the firmware to fool the DSi into thinking it’s a real game, and then load up into it.

Technically, this makes all DSi flashcards illegal as they distribute copyrighted ROMs and code. In many of the DSi flashcards, you can dump the firmware and extract [their ROM info].”

According to Narin, the DSONEi isn’t the complete solution to beating Nintendo at its firmware game. Because of how DSi-compatible flashcarts are currently designed, the DSONEi is as vulnerable as other products:

"Flashcards use real ROMs to fool the DSi into loading the flashcard into a DS compatibility mode. Nintendo, if they were inclined to, could easily make a firmware update to render this method unusable making all current DSi flashcards obselete.

The problem is, this is the only method the flashcard companies have to load flashcards on the DSi. The best they can do is use a different ROM in their firmware to try to fool the DSi into thinking it’s a real game, though if Nintendo adds a check for the flashcard itself and not for the actual game, it would render the flashcards useless until the protection on the DSi is actually cracked.”

So, if you’re planning on purchasing a DSONEi — for homebrew purposes, of course — keep in mind that Nintendo could still release a system update that would make it incompatible with your DSi.

See also: Narin comments on Metaforic’s anti-piracy DS tech, Flashcarts defeating anti-piracy measures with anti-anti-piracy feature


*Narin emphasizes that these statements are his personal opinions and do not reflect the views of GBAtemp.net.