Tiny Cartridge 3DS

Shadowrun page from a Nintendo Magazine System preview (issue #11, August 1993). Every few months, I get the urge to play the Shadowrun SNES game on a handheld, which isn’t going to happen until series creator Jordan Weisman tracks down the rights. :o/
The screenshots shown on the left side of the page are from the Game Boy edition of Shadowrun that Beam Software created but never released. It was a sidescrolling platformer in which you played a Street Samurai  — psyche, that’s actually Edd the Duck, a game based on the BBC character and released by Beam’s subsidiary Lazerbeam.
Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)
See also: More Shadowrun frothing[Via Do Go On]

Shadowrun page from a Nintendo Magazine System preview (issue #11, August 1993). Every few months, I get the urge to play the Shadowrun SNES game on a handheld, which isn’t going to happen until series creator Jordan Weisman tracks down the rights. :o/

The screenshots shown on the left side of the page are from the Game Boy edition of Shadowrun that Beam Software created but never released. It was a sidescrolling platformer in which you played a Street Samurai — psyche, that’s actually Edd the Duck, a game based on the BBC character and released by Beam’s subsidiary Lazerbeam.

Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)
See also: More Shadowrun frothing
[Via Do Go On]

Memorable music from Shadowrun (SNES). One of the reasons why I’m always talking about this game is nothing played, looked, or sounded like it at the time. Really hope Jordan Weisman finds a way to re-release it one day.

Some great, related news by the way: Weisman and Harebrained Schemes have brought the original composers for the SNES and Genesis games, Marshall Parker and Sam Powell, in to collaborate on Shadowrun Returns (PC/tablet) soundtrack. Definitely fund this game if you have the cash — its Kickstarter campaign ends today.

The tiny artwork on the left, by the way, is the seldom seen Super Famicom packaging for Shadowrun.

Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)
See also: More Shadowrun frothing
[Via HG101]

I don’t ever say which of my three boys I love best, and I’m very careful never to say which games of mine I like better than another.

Shadowrun creator Jordan Weisman, sidestepping my request for him to finally settle the score and admit that the more linear Shadowrun game for SNES was way better than the open-world Genesis version. Real talk, anybody whose face is not stupid knows this is true.

This bit of hard-hitting journalism didn’t make it into my bigger Gamasutra interview with Jordan, but a lot of other fun stuff about the 16-bit games and his new Shadowrun Returns project are in there.

Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)
See also: More Shadowrun frothing

It’s a matter of tracking them down. We’ve actually been trying to track down [Shadowrun SNES] because we would love to be able to in some way offer that to the fans.

We’ll see where that goes, but I certainly don’t want to make any promises about it because we need to find out who owns it at this point.

Shadowrun creator Jordan Weisman discussing efforts to track down and re-release Beam Software and Data East’s beloved SNES game for the series.

I did a big interview with Weisman about the 16-bit games, his new Kickstarter-funded Shadowrun Returns project, and more in this new interview at Gamasutra.

Did you know that the Shadowrun Returns PC/tablet game will feature a special mission that ties together the stories of the Shadowrun SNES and Genesis games? Neat!

Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)
See also: More Shadowrun frothing

Farewell, Beam Software

Reports emerging today indicate that Krome Studios (Star Wars: The Force Unleashed, Game Room) has laid off all its workers and will, for the most part, close this Sunday.

While it’s depressing to hear about any developer shuttering, this closure is especially sad as it includes Krome’s Melbourne branch, previously known as Melbourne House and Beam Software — the longest running development studio in Australia.

Though Beam was apparently responsible for the awful Back to the Future NES games, I’ll remember the studio for its Smash TV ports, Krush Kill ‘n’ Destroy, and the SNES masterpiece I can’t help but bring up whenever an opportunity presents itself (like this one), Shadowrun.

And to quote Oscar-winning hip-hop group Three 6 Mafia, “Fuck what you heard and it just no doubt,” the SNES release of Shadowrun was wayyy more fun than BlueSky’s Genesis game. Keep that thought in your mind as you tip a 40 later tonight in Krome’s honor.

Buy: Shadowrun (SNES)

See also: Reasons To Return To Classic Shadowruns

Screenshot from Shadowrun's handheld port. Well, this would be an image from a DS edition of Shadowrun if it weren’t April Fools’ Day. Or if FASA and Microsoft Game Studios didn’t produce that awful first-person shooter several years ago, which likely ruined any chances of future video game development for the series.
Pixel artist Ian MacLean, by the way, created the above mock-up. Here’s what a typical bar scene looked like in the original Shadowrun SNES game:

Oh, and I meant to link this months ago, but HG101’s Kurt Kalata tracked down Alien Earth, which is another Shadowrun-type release for PC from the Australian developer of the SNES game, Beam Software (which eventually turned into Krome Studios Melbourne). Unfortunately, it looks and plays like ass, but I’d never heard of Alien Earth until this article!
See also: Reasons To Return To Classic Shadowruns
[Via Ian McLean]

Screenshot from Shadowrun's handheld port. Well, this would be an image from a DS edition of Shadowrun if it weren’t April Fools’ Day. Or if FASA and Microsoft Game Studios didn’t produce that awful first-person shooter several years ago, which likely ruined any chances of future video game development for the series.

Pixel artist Ian MacLean, by the way, created the above mock-up. Here’s what a typical bar scene looked like in the original Shadowrun SNES game:

Oh, and I meant to link this months ago, but HG101’s Kurt Kalata tracked down Alien Earth, which is another Shadowrun-type release for PC from the Australian developer of the SNES game, Beam Software (which eventually turned into Krome Studios Melbourne). Unfortunately, it looks and plays like ass, but I’d never heard of Alien Earth until this article!

See also: Reasons To Return To Classic Shadowruns

[Via Ian McLean]

Reasons To Return To Classic Shadowruns

Though FASA Interactive and Microsoft’s Shadowrun first-person shooter in 2007 was widely regarded as an awful idea, we still have the cyberpunk series’ previous three games to return to and enjoy.

In fact, the SNES, Genesis, and import Sega CD games (each separate experiences from different developers despite sharing identical titles) have all seen recent developments that might convince you to play them again even if you already ran through them a decade ago.

  • The top-down, open world Genesis game has a new conversion mod that revises your starting races, characters, stats, inventories, and more. Programmer Magus77 also made lots of changes to the weapons and text/dialogue, though I haven’t tried it out myself to see if this improves or damages the game. Dragoon Zero’s Races mod is also worth trying, too.
  • Someone unearthed a beta ROM of the European SNES game (I typically don’t like to direct link ROMs, but I’m making an exception since this wasn’t intended for retail release), which someone should investigate. There’s a similar beta ROM for the U.S. edition, and that revealed a few “censored” edits:

  • As for the Japan-only Sega CD game (intro cinematic embedded above), someone put out a call for technical help to create an English patch several months ago. This isn’t the first time someone’s hinted at an upcoming translation for the text-heavy title, but I’m mentioning it anyway because maybe some kind-hearted ROM hacker will read this post and lend their talents to the project.

If it’s not obvious, I love the Shadowrun series and spend too much time following unofficial projects since the PC game killed any chances of future video games. Also, I wish there was a DS emulator that ran Shadowrun SNES without any issues so I could play this on a portable.

[Via Romhacking]

Thoughts concerning GTA: Chinatown Wars

Despite my dissatisfaction with Grand Theft Auto Advance and my tendency to avoid mainstream Western titles, I’m excited about GTA: Chinatown Wars! This month’s issue of Nintendo Power has details on the upcoming game, and I’ve picked the five items that interested me the most.

  • isometric camera angle

Aw, hellz yeah! Maybe this will play/look like my favorite SNES RPG, Shadowrun?

  • cel-shaded polygons with black borders

Or maybe not.

  • missions designed for short periods of play

Fantastic! As I’ve mentioned before, I love to see big games adapted with handheld gamers in mind, so long as the alterations are well thought out.

  • control pad aiming, auto targeting with R button

At first, this sounded like a missed opportunity for touchscreen gunplay and aiming that doesn’t suck. But, after a few minutes of consideration, this was probably for the best, as it’d be annoying to switch control methods everytime a combat situation arises.

  • radio stations play more instrumentals than vocals

Though understandable, this is disappointing. I want to cruise around Liberty City listening to Big Pun’s “Twinz (Deep Cover 98’),” not Darude’s “Sandstorm.”