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Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting on Virtual Boy ⊟

This is nuts. Mr. Anon created and posted a playable demo ROM of Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting for the Virtual Boy (modding a fighting engine created by M.K.). How is this possible? Wait, is this actually possible?

Yes, somehow. Video proof:

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  • Source planetvb.com
"Invisible Arrival" by Edwin Ushiro
I think the Champion Edition cabinet is out of service — I can’t see any reason why you’d play the original version otherwise.
This mixed media artwork (17.4” x 17”) is available to purchase at Giant Robot for $2,500. Ushiro has several other non-gaming pieces for sale at the shop.
BUY SSFIV 3D Edition, 25th Anniversary Collector's Set

"Invisible Arrival" by Edwin Ushiro

I think the Champion Edition cabinet is out of service — I can’t see any reason why you’d play the original version otherwise.

This mixed media artwork (17.4” x 17”) is available to purchase at Giant Robot for $2,500. Ushiro has several other non-gaming pieces for sale at the shop.

BUY SSFIV 3D Edition, 25th Anniversary Collector's Set
  • Source secure.giantrobot.com
Scene from a local Street Fighter II tournament in 1992 (click for a larger image). There’s a fun story about the arcade/tournament experience to go with the photo:

"We hung out together inside and outside the arcade. I was the group’s official bait when they went to play for cash. I sucked and still suck at Street Fighter, but they’d let me beat them match after match until a sizable crowd gathered and they managed to find folks willing to play for money. Then they’d come in and win all the cash they could.
It finally dawned on me one day that maybe it was worth doing something a bit more legitimate with Street Fighter: A tournament.
So I called up the local arcade cabinet reseller to get in touch with Capcom. I finally tracked someone down in California who seemed completely disinterested in the idea of a tournament for Street Fighter II. So I did it on my own.
It was strictly word of mouth. Because we all played Street Fighter II so much, our arcade’s machines were some of the best maintained, so we often attracted players from around the state. They told their friends and by the night of the tournament our mall arcade was so packed you couldn’t step inside it.”

I haven’t been to a fighting game tourney in a long time — mostly due to the death of mall arcades in my area — but I miss that energy and excitement everyone would feel during those matches, and that anticipation in the days leading up to the event.
Buy: Super Street Fighter IV
See also: More arcade, Street Fighter II posts
[Via Kotaku]

Scene from a local Street Fighter II tournament in 1992 (click for a larger image). There’s a fun story about the arcade/tournament experience to go with the photo:

"We hung out together inside and outside the arcade. I was the group’s official bait when they went to play for cash. I sucked and still suck at Street Fighter, but they’d let me beat them match after match until a sizable crowd gathered and they managed to find folks willing to play for money. Then they’d come in and win all the cash they could.

It finally dawned on me one day that maybe it was worth doing something a bit more legitimate with Street Fighter: A tournament.

So I called up the local arcade cabinet reseller to get in touch with Capcom. I finally tracked someone down in California who seemed completely disinterested in the idea of a tournament for Street Fighter II. So I did it on my own.

It was strictly word of mouth. Because we all played Street Fighter II so much, our arcade’s machines were some of the best maintained, so we often attracted players from around the state. They told their friends and by the night of the tournament our mall arcade was so packed you couldn’t step inside it.”

I haven’t been to a fighting game tourney in a long time — mostly due to the death of mall arcades in my area — but I miss that energy and excitement everyone would feel during those matches, and that anticipation in the days leading up to the event.

Buy: Super Street Fighter IV

See also: More arcade, Street Fighter II posts

[Via Kotaku]

E. Honda’s stage as graffiti, captured by Chtrees Pizza (click for a larger image). I like to imagine this as a scene from a hacked, bootleg version of Street Fighter II filled with subtle discrepancies like Guile’s missing tattoos, the background flag lighting up before the round ends, and the giant purple tag defacing the bathhouse.
Buy: Super Street Fighter IV
See also: E. Honda’s flying headbutt, 
[Via Chtrees Pizza, Albotas]

E. Honda’s stage as graffiti, captured by Chtrees Pizza (click for a larger image). I like to imagine this as a scene from a hacked, bootleg version of Street Fighter II filled with subtle discrepancies like Guile’s missing tattoos, the background flag lighting up before the round ends, and the giant purple tag defacing the bathhouse.

Buy: Super Street Fighter IV

See also: E. Honda’s flying headbutt,

[Via Chtrees Pizza, Albotas]

Scribblenaut-ized Street Fighter 2 cast by Edison Yan. I love E. Honda’s expression. And Blanka is all “Mraw!”
Some of you will recognize Yan, one of the artists at Scribblenauts developer 5th Cell, as the same talented bloke that brought NeoGAF’s Post #217 scene to life.
He didn’t stop at just SFII's crew, drawing 18 more fighters to present SFIII's entire lineup, in Scribblenauts form (click for a larger version):

He sketched Final Fantasy VII's troupe, too (Aeris dies):

Preorder: Scribblenauts
See also: Turk128’s Scribblenaut-ized characters, More characters you won’t find in Scribblenauts
[Via Edison Yan]

Scribblenaut-ized Street Fighter 2 cast by Edison Yan. I love E. Honda’s expression. And Blanka is all “Mraw!”

Some of you will recognize Yan, one of the artists at Scribblenauts developer 5th Cell, as the same talented bloke that brought NeoGAF’s Post #217 scene to life.

He didn’t stop at just SFII's crew, drawing 18 more fighters to present SFIII's entire lineup, in Scribblenauts form (click for a larger version):

He sketched Final Fantasy VII's troupe, too (Aeris dies):

Preorder: Scribblenauts

See also: Turk128’s Scribblenaut-ized characters, More characters you won’t find in Scribblenauts

[Via Edison Yan]

Made in Ore microgame: Dragon Punch Ken’s wife.

Did you know that Ken Masters’ wife, Eliza, is also Guile’s sister-in-law? Crazy! Anyway, in this user-created game inspired by Ken’s Street Fighter II ending, two versions of Eliza run towards you — the original Eliza with a mannish face and a 5 o’clock shadow from the “classic” SFII's ending, and the modified, more feminine Eliza that appeared in subsequent SFII editions.

To win, you need to either use your Rising Dragon Fist to prevent the less becoming Eliza from reaching you, or allow her more appealing counterpart to throw herself into your arms. Very shallow, I know. This game would have been a lot more rad if it required you to actually input the Dragon Punch command with the directional pad, instead of asking for just a tap.

Man, I forgot how creepy Ken looked in the original Street Fighter II. He totally has sex-offender face:

Import: Made in Ore

See also: A bunch of Made in Ore posts

German Super Street Fighter II advertisement.
I love that Thunder Hawk is all but obscured in this piece — only a feather can be seen, peeking from behind Dee Jay’s maximum leg. At least there’s a small sprite of him in the ad’s single screenshot.
See also: Street Fighter Alpha promotional art

German Super Street Fighter II advertisement.

I love that Thunder Hawk is all but obscured in this piece — only a feather can be seen, peeking from behind Dee Jay’s maximum leg. At least there’s a small sprite of him in the ad’s single screenshot.

See also: Street Fighter Alpha promotional art

"Spittin’ Narcissism (Vega Stage)" by José the Bronx Rican, from the official Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix soundtrack. Capcom worked with online game music community OverClocked Remix to produce the soundtrack, which is largely based on the “Blood on the Asphalt" project from 2006.

Not only is it very cool that Capcom used fan-made tracks for the game, the tracks themselves sound quite nice. They aren’t as radically reimagined as the Street Fighter Tribute Album versions of the same songs, but rather nice-sounding updates.

Just yesterday I was expressing my appreciation for electrocuted Street Fighter II skeleton sprites. GamesRadar’s feature on gaming’s best skeletons leads off with skeletons from Street Fighters II, Alpha, III, and EX! Well, in EX’s case, it’s not so much a “skeleton” as it is an “insane, overworked salaryman.”

Exclusive t-shirt design made by Meat Bun for the Street Fighter Club event in Brooklyn. I love that they made a shirt based on an instantly recognizable aspect of Street Fighter II that hasn’t been done to death.
Eric pointed out that the title of the Meat Bun blog post (“Brooklyn Took It”) is a Jeru the Damaja reference. Glad he’s around to know things about music that wasn’t produced for Sega.

Exclusive t-shirt design made by Meat Bun for the Street Fighter Club event in Brooklyn. I love that they made a shirt based on an instantly recognizable aspect of Street Fighter II that hasn’t been done to death.

Eric pointed out that the title of the Meat Bun blog post (“Brooklyn Took It”) is a Jeru the Damaja reference. Glad he’s around to know things about music that wasn’t produced for Sega.